Categories
Conferences Technology

Ditch that intro slide

Australian Testing days is off to an awesome start. I always enjoy the community vibe at these events. However there’s tons of poorly designed slide decks out there. Here’s some advice. Ditch the intro slide with your picture on it. The audience doesn’t care and we know what you look like. You are standing right in front of us.

Chhavi Raj Dosaj gave a good introductory talk on “on practical AI for the tester”. I have the sketchnotes here:

However, I just wish I could have walked him through my workshop material on giving better technical presentations before he got up on stage. This type of mentoring is something I offer for free. I love helping people improve their technical presentations. It makes every conference experience better for everyone involved. His slide deck could have been better. For example;

This intro slide

We don’t need a slide with your picture on it. You are standing right in front of us. We know what you look like. Keep this for the offline version for sharing if you like but you should never have a slide with your picture on it when standing in front of a crowd. This is my personal opinion, but do you think this adds any value?

There are too many words on this slide

Can you read what’s on this slide from that photo? no? me neither. Only the people in the front row would have been able to read this. Anyone further back in the crowd can’t. Also when people read they stop listening to what you are talking about. Think of your slide deck as a good user interface, your goal is to teach us something new. Not cause us to be distracted from reading your words when you want us to focus on what you are saying. Wordy slides are good for offline sharing. They aren’t needed in a physical presentation. Slides are free. If this content is important use the slow reveal technique to build up. If not, dump it. You have already established you credibility. the audience doesn’t need your words to figure out you are competent on stage and that you know the material you are presenting. You are already standing in front of us and we are already seated. Waiting to hear your insights on the topic.

Don’t put anything important on the bottom third

Only the front row can read this content. Everyone else has to strain or just completely ignore any information you put here.

In summary, ditch that intro slide. The audience already knows your name; it’s on the schedule. We are already convinced of your value; we are sitting in the audience. The audience just wants you to get to the learning material. Want a challenge for slide design? Try the Takahashi minimalistic slide design or a presentation using only images, it will force you to focus on your story over your slides.

Categories
Agile Conferences Technology

Agile Australia 2018

On Tuesday the 19th of June I spoke at Agile Australia( access the recording here) on how to get more people involved with testing. You can access my slides; The bug hunt is on. I proposed 5 activities to help get more people involved with quality:

  1. Bug Bashes
  2. Bug Bounties
  3. Dog Fooding
  4. Knowledge sharing practices
  5. Soap Opera testing (you also watch the first three minutes of this video)

Sketch notes

Here are all of my sketch notes on the presentations I attended;

My personal highlights where Nigel’s talk on “Agile is the last thing you need”:

And Martin Fowler’s talk on “the state of Agile in 2018”:

Steven gave an interesting talk on visual strategy maps:

Categories
Conferences mental health Presenting Software Testing Technology

Getting up on stage

I enjoy performing. Don’t ask me why. I can’t explain it. You could say it’s something to do with the rush, or the perception of adding value or entertainment for other people. I want to tell you a few stories about my adventures in performing. Do you want to improve your performances? I’m available for free consultations on improving technical presentations.

During High School

I was involved with nearly every extra curricular activity I could sign up for. I was in the school concert band; I played trombone. I can legitimately say, “this one time in band camp …”. I was the fat kid in school, there weren’t many other kids fatter than I. I once got up in front of my whole school dressed up in a Santa suit and played Jingle Bells on the trombone. Talk about a nerve racking, getting out of my comfort zone experience. I got a laugh at least. I was in an Auslan signing choir (Australian Sign Language) and a singing choir too. In the signing choir we would often perform to retirement homes in the area and our signature song was, “I believe I can fly” by R Kelly. I could still sign to that song. What does a signing choir performance look like? Check out this example on YouTube;

Watching that makes me want to sign up to an auslan class and pursue deaf poetry.

I was also in a musical. It was called Wolfstock, it was a 1950’s themed musical about a 16 year old boy called Jay, his parents had sold his soul to the devil and had to get to wolfstock (aka woodstock) before the next full moon or else he would remain a warewolf. I played Wolfman Jack in act 2; a character based on the DJ host by the same name, I even had my own song. I’m sure the musical was terrible. My mum has it on tape somewhere. I’m sorry mum for putting you through all of my horrible performances in school.

During Uni

I ran my own radio show on a community radio station called, “chat with an engineer”. I would interview engineers in our community and chat about the work they did. It was to help raise the profile of Engineering. I didn’t have the budget for the training course so I asked Engineers Australia if they’d paid for me to do the course. They did and I’m forever grateful for that. My biggest success was interviewing 2012’s Young Australian of the Year; Marita Cheng. She was visiting a high school as part of a Robogals visit and we were able to organise an interview.

I also started the Robogals Chapter in Tasmania. Robogals is a student run group who promote engineering and technology to young kids through lego robotics workshops with the goal of increasing female engineers. I taught robotics to over 1000 kids in tasmania in the 1.5 years I was involved with Robogals with next to no funding and while going through my first bout of chronic depression. I can’t understand how I was functioning, I wasn’t passing uni so let’s just say I wasn’t functioning very well. Teaching is another type of performance that I enjoy.

Professional Presentations

During my professional career the main performances I’ve been involved with are presentations. My most nerve wracking experience was getting up in front of the whole company during an all hands and talking about my struggles with depression. Getting that venerable in front of such a large crowd is another one of those big, “getting out of my comfort zone” experiences. It’s definitely made giving technical presentations easier. Interviews are another performance. A lot of people hate interviews, in a weird way I enjoy them. Having that opportunity to talk about my passions in software testing is what I enjoy. I am narcissistic. I remember doing a first year psychology 101 personality test during uni, I scored very highly on the narcissistic scale and I’m ok with that. It’s only an issue when it’s combined with a lack of empathy.

I’ve been involved with a few community bands since moving to Sydney. The Sydney homotones and Sunday Assembly being the main ones. I’m not actively involved with any now but I would love to join a community swing band. Or do some taiko drum classes. Or learn how to play the double bass. Garhhh, I can’t decide.

My favourite presentation has been my talk at YOW! Connected last year on using robots for mobile testing;

I was able to combine my passion for music, robots and mobile testing. #Winning at life.

I’ve collected a bunch of hints and tips on giving presentations. Reach out to me at sam[AT]thebughunter.com.au if you’d like a free consultation.

Categories
Conferences Technology

Diversity in conferences

are you struggling to attract diverse speakers at your tech conferences?

take a leaf out of Katie Conf’s book and challenge yourself to find those female speakers. All of the speakers at Katie Conf have names that are based on the name Katherine and are actively involved with their tech communities. If they could organize a theoretical conference with only Katie speakers, you can easily find a few women to talk at your conference.

If you are still struggling, maybe you could approach speak easy, this group help mentor potential speakers who come from diverse backgrounds.