Categories
Mobile Testing Software Testing Technology

Setting up a homemade charging station

At Insight Timer we’ve just ordered a whole bunch of refurbished second hand android phones from Green Gadgets Australia for testing our Android app. We managed to get 9 devices for under $2K and it also gave as a pretty good manufacturer spread from Samsung to Google. This blog is how I went about building a home made charging station for these phones.

First, finding and ordering the phones

 

look – shiny, the makings of a mobile device farm

Keeping all of these phones charged

The two tablets came in large boxes. I decided I wanted to convert one of those boxes into a charging station. All of the phones had bits of foam that were used to hold the phones in place. I cut up these pieces of foam and hot glued them into the box. I used the left over phone boxes to store extra cables.

However, I forgot to counter for actually plugging the USB’s into something. Next on the order list was a bunch of USB charging stations, extra cables and cable ties. All ordered via MWave.

Charging Station 2nd iteration 

After the USB charging stations, cables and 2 more phones from a Chinese supplier turned up I got to work on organising cables. We now have an Xaomi and a Lenovo in our device list.

 

I even have all of the cable types segregated, so there’s spaces to charge some of the test iPhones we have floating around too.

Conclusion

I’m quite pleased with our spread of devices and the budget of this set up. These devices aren’t exactly the highest end phones today but it’s a good thing our developers love to have the latest and greatest tech toys so they already have the high end covered. I might add one or two more phones that represent tiny screens. Have you built your own device farm before? How’d you keep all of the phones charged?

Categories
Conferences Uncategorized

Visual thinking with sketchnotes

I’m a visual learner. I like to draw things as I absorb information. I enjoy doing sketchnotes while I’m at a conference. See YOW! Sydney 2018Australian Testing days and Agile Australia as examples of these sketch notes in practice. It helps keep me in the moment and focused on the talk material. It’s also a nice thing to hand to the speakers as they get off the stage. Here is my workshop material for learning sketch noting:

Everyone can draw

You brain is a pattern recognition machine and will turn almost anything into something you recognise. Even your random squiggles can turn into birds. Try this squiggle birds exercise out as a warm up:

Mindmapping

Mind mapping is a good way to start with visual thinking. You have your central idea in the centre of the page and all of your ideas related to that idea radiating out if it:

Source: https://www.mindmeister.com/blog/mind-maps-essay-writing/

You can use a mindmap to brainstorm ideas like, “How do I test a username/password field?”. Michael Bolton has a this fabulous mindmap just for this problem:

A Michael Bolton mindmap

Sketchnotes

you can do sketch noting without drawing. You can start with lettering and things like bullets, frames and connectors:

 

I use banners everywhere

You can even find youtube videos for doing these banners

Build up a library of icons

There are many common icons you’ll use. I often draw light bulbs, locks, poop emoji’s and tools (what does that say about the state of technology?). 

Use colour to highlight ideas

It might feel like you are back in primary school colouring in borders but I love adding shadows and some colour highlights to my sketchnotes to really make them stand out/seem more 3D.

Practice your stick figures

people are often used to communicate abstract ideas. There’s lots of different styles out there and you will find your own.

Give it a go

The next time you are watching a lecture/presentation on youtube, try and take some sketch notes and let me know how you go.