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Where are they now?

Have you heard of the Agile Manifesto? It was published in 2001 when 17 blokes who work in tech came together to come up with a consolidated way of working. They came up with 12 principles which still hold up today. It’s worth a read.

This blog is digging into the archives and asking the question; where are they now? It is in alphabetical order by surname.

Kent Beck

He’s got a wikipedia page, I wonder how many of these blokes have their own wikipedia page? Author of the extreme programming series, which I’ve heard still holds up today.

You could also watch his recent YOW! Conference keynote presentation from 2018:

You can check out my sketchnotes of his talk here:

Mike Beedle

He also has a wikipedia page, he died in 2018, he got stabbed. Ouch, my condolences to his family and the community. At least he didn’t have to experience the dumpster fire that is 2020.

Arie van Bennekum

Alistair Cockburn

Ward Cunningham

Most of these blokes have a wikipedia page. But here’s the first one in this list to have a TEDx talk:

Martin Fowler

I often reference Martin Fowler’s content on my blog. I’ve also seen this bloke give a few presentations here in the land down under too:

James Grenning

Has published a book on TDD for embedded chips. Here’s a talk for TDD for embedded systems (I’m a sucker for a good testing talk):

Jim Highsmith

Andrew Hunt

I’ve been meaning to read the pragmatic programmer. Rubber ducking as a debug method was coined in that book and referenced in this talk:

Ron Jeffries

I’m following Ron on twitter, his blog on space invaders and testing seems to be a bit of fun to read. Does everything have to be a user story?

Jon Kern

He doesn’t have a SSL cert on his blog, well my old blog has had the SSL cert expire so I can’t blame him.

Brian Marick

Robert C. Martin

There’s a bit of controversy around “Uncle Bob”. I’ve previously mentioned some of these issues. So I won’t say too much but he’s been “cancelled” for a recent conference and then threatened to sue. Lovely stuff.

Steve Mellor

Ken Schwaber

If you want a bit of context on the term of Scrum, here is a good talk:

Jeff Sutherland

He’s also got a TEDx talk:

Dave Thomas

Finally I’ll leave you an Agile is Dead talk by Dave Thomas. It’s probably one of the most viewed software engineering talks on youtube that I’ve seen since I started putting this blog post together (over 1.2 million views):

Conclusion

Surprisingly, only one of these blokes is confirmed as dead. And there is a serious lack of diversity in this group. However they have all been instrumental in current development practices. Who hasn’t heard of Agile?

So who do you think is driving software development further these days?

Categories
Critical Thinking Software Testing Testing Archives

Interviewing technical testers

Angie Jones has this awesome video explaining the technical interview process for software testers. This blog is a summary of that process in written form. I often watch these videos at double speed.

1. The Testing Question

Many automation engineers out there are great at code but not so great at the testing element. Companies are looking for people with strong skills in both. Someone could ask you:

  • How would you test this pen/chair/bottle?
  • How would you test a username/password log in field on a website?

It’s easy to jump straight into test scenarios. BUT make sure you come back to the context;

  • Why is this being tested?
  • Who is it being built for?
  • What are the requirements/features?

2. Unit Testing

You might be given a sample function and ask to come up with some unit testing ideas. As an Automation Engineer you probably won’t be writing unit tests but this question is to see how you apply that testing mindset. You might answer this in a Test Driven Development approach.

public int add(int a, int b);
  • Does this method add two integers and return it?
  • What are the min and max values? e.g. is what about an integer larger than 32 bits?
  • a = 0 and/or b = 0
  • Negative numbers?

3. Service Tests

You might be asked to test a simple CRUD API for a sample API e.g. user management, what scenarios would you create to test the API? Make sure to talk about the different HTTP methods and the different error responses. How would you create scenarios to test them?

4. UI Tests

You might be given a web page and asked to create some UI tests using the tools you are the most familiar with. You could talk about the different approaches you might use too. If you could talk out how you would build out a page object model, what parts are common across different pages and how you’d abstract them out in their own classes such that they could be easily reused this would be gold.

5. Programming questions

Unfortunately you might have the same programming questions thrown at you as developers. These are a horrible part of the interview process but it’s something we have to live with. HackerRank is a great way to practice and to get efficient at this type of performance.

Dan Ashby’s approach to interviewing testers

Dan Ashby has this great post on how he interviews testers using this mindmap:

My approach

If I was interview a technical tester I’d start with an intro. We will then dive into an exploratory testing question. Then ask about using GIT and how you would collaborate with developers. Then deep diving into some more technical questions on unit/API testing depending on the role.

  • tell me a bit about yourself…
  • How would you test a username/password login page?
  • How do you create a pull request in GIT?
  • What unit tests for this function can you come up with?
  • How would you test this sample API?

If I was interviewing for a mobile tester role I’d ask about using command line tools like Android Debug Bridge (ADB). For example, how would you generate a battery historian report and pull files from an android device using ADB?

How do you go about interviewing testers? Do you have any other tips to add?

Categories
Software Testing Testing Archives

Testing Archives – August 01

There’s tons if software testing weekly newsletters for keeping up to date on current trends. There’s testing bits and Software Testing Weekly. But this got me thinking, how much awesome content is out there that could be resurfaced?

Welcome to my first Software Testing Archives series. This series is a deep dive into content that was published this month years ago.

Subscribe to get this content straight to your inbox:

August 2016 – CAST Conference keynote

My old boss from Tyro; Anne-Marie Charrett gave this awesome keynote at CAST conference 2016. The sentiment is transitioning from Test Manager to Test Leader. This conversation is still relevant today. When Anne-Marie left Tyro, I co-authored with Brian Osman this blog post on free range testing; a reflection of my experiences working in this team environment. I was tester number 8 and the second tester to be embedded in a dev team. I saw that team grow to 23 testers.

August 2012 – Defending the qualitative approach

This bog is by Ilari Henrik Aegerter who runs the House of Testing, Ilari has recently started posting single slide videos on a topic of software testing up on LinkedIn. You should check them out.

August 2010 – Exploratory Test Automation

Douglas Hoffman and Cem Kaner gave this presentation at Cast Conference. Both of these blokes have been contributing to the testing industry for a very long time. Cem Kaner started the BBST software testing training program. Here’s some videos that feature these two blokes:

August 2005 – How to investigate an intermittent problem

Have you every experienced a problem and haven’t been able to reproduce it 100% of the time? What did you do about it? James Bach does a deep dive into how to investigate these problems in more detail.